Kate Mckeown
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Kate Mckeown

Entrepreneur, writer, inventor, and radical professor. MBA Professor for 14 years. Co-wrote "Beyond IBM" with Lou Mobley.

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/kate-mckeown/0/b3/aaa
New York NY
Member since April 06, 2014
Quote
My mission is radical change in education in one generation. The secret is that everyone is a "giinus" at something. My mentor Dr. W.Edwards Deming, said, "With systems, change you can transform a country in one generation. We're working on systems change, and if we succeed there will be millions of new companies. Some of them will change the world the same way I know the Jellyfish will. Quote_down
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I am a(n):

Entrepreneur

Companies I work or worked for:
Achievements (products built, personal awards won):

Patent-holder
Enabled more than 1000 MBA's to be creators
Worked with W. Edwards Deming for more than 10 years, helped him with his book, "Out of the Crisis", and am quoted in it several times.

If you're an entrepreneur or corporate innovator, why?

FREEDOM

My favorite startups:

Brimes Energy Inc. -Ram will change the face of energy forever.

What's most frustrating and rewarding about entrepreneurship/innovation?

You change the world.

What's the No. 1 mistake entrepreneurs/innovators make?

Don't understand cash flow.

What are the top three lessons you've learned as an entrepreneur?

1. Hussle with honor
2. Help and be helped,
3.Everything else is in details.

Full bio

Kate McKeown is a writer, entrepreneur, inventor, and radical professor. She is the co-author, with Lou Mobley, of Beyond IBM, generously called a “best-selling business book” by the Wall Street Journal. Kate’s non-fiction has been published in many business journals, from the "The Harvard Business Review" to "The Controller's Quarterly."  

Kate worked extensively with W. Edwards Deming for more than ten years, including helping him to edit his book, Out of the Crisis, published by MIT Press. His next-systems-level thinking changed a country in one generation.  

As an entrepreneur, Kate founded several companies, including C.W.O., Inc. (Cold War’s Over), a company that imported Russian military clothing for sale in the US, covered by Business Week in “Developments to Watch.” Recently she founded "Sacred Night Chocolate," a company that offers a kit that allows anyone to make superb gourmet chocolate in the microwave as quickly and easily as popcorn (patent-pending, of course). She is seeking funding for this even as she writes!  

Kate, in her dim past, was Chapter President of the Washington, DC, Chapter of the Young Entrepreneurs’ Organization, (YEO, now EO) where her mentor was Ray Hickok, the founder of YPO, the Young Presidents' Organization. From Ray she learned the importance of community and a peer forum in individual success.  

As an inventor, Kate holds one patent, which she wrote (except for the claims) and prosecuted, and generally has several provisional patents pending. She sold one of her inventions on the QVC home shopping channel.  

As a professor, Kate incites Entrepreneurship at the Fordham Graduate School of Business, and was Entrepreneur Fellow for a year with the undergraduates. She taught for a decade in the Birthing of Giants program for entrepreneurs at MIT, co-sponsored by Inc. Magazine and EO. Kate has also taught finance to many groups of American businesspeople and entrepreneurs, in forums such as Comdex, and the AMA, and has guest lectured to groups of Russian and Chinese businesspeople (and anyone else who will listen) about the values underlying an entrepreneurial economy.  

INNOVATION IN BIOs: to see the real truth of what Kate is trying to do as a teacher, ignore all these words and go to YouTube and type in "education for good" including the quotation marks...you will get a playlist of real students talking about how education needs to change, so that students of all ages become 21st-century entrepreneurs and inventors and licensors and licensees, not 20th-century factory workers.