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Wall Street and Markets

110799

Earnings roundup: who won and who lost

While Alphabet became the world's most profitable company, LinkedIn lost $10B in market cap

Innovation series by Steven Loeb
February 27, 2016
Short URL: http://vator.tv/n/4399

The markets have sputtered so far this year, though there are some signs that it could be coming back. It's been especially hard on tech companies, many of which have seen their stock prices tank in the first few weeks of the 2016.

Despite how the overall market does, though, those companies are given multiple chances a year to show that, no matter what the conditions are right now, they are still showing signs of growth.

With the fourth quarter earnings season wrapping up, let's take a look at who came out on top, and who got shellacked.

The company that probably got hit the hardest this year was LinkedIn. While the company beat expectations in its latest quarterly report, it showed weaker-than-expected guidance. That sent its stock tumbling down over 25 in after hours trading, and then down 40 percent the next day, losing $10 billion in the process. 

Revenue: $862 million

Expected Revenue: $858 million

EPS: $0.94

Expected EPS: $0.78

Stock price at close: $192.28 per share

Current price: $121.28 per share

Percentage change: down 37 percent

 

Twitter did well in its quarter earnings, beating in EPS and matching in revenue, yet its stock tanked over 11 percent out of the gate. Once again, the culprit was lower-than-expected user growth, which was either flat, or went down, depending on how you looked at it, not a good sign for a company that has had this same problem for two years now. 

Still, the company has actually managed to do well since then, with its stock rising nearly 20 percent. 

Revenue: $710 million

Expected Revenue: $709.97 million

EPS: $0.16

Expected EPS: $0.12

Stock price at close: $14.98 per share

Current price: $17.94 per share

Percentage change: up 19.8 percent

 

Facebook just crushed it in its Q4 earnings, and hit a new high in MAUs with 1.59 billion. and saw its stock price grow by 14 percent. 

 Revenue:  $5.84 billion

Expected Revenue: $5.67 billion

EPS: $0.79

Expected EPS: $0.75

Stock price at close: $94.45 per share

Current price: $107.92 per share

Percentage change: up 14.3 percent

 

Alphabet, its first earnings report since its formation as Google's new parent company last year, beat easily, and, in the process, overcoming Apple to become the most valuable company in the world, with a market cap of $547.1 billion.

And yet, the company has lost over 6 percent of its stock price since then. 

Revenue: $21.33 billion

Expected Revenue: $20.77 billion

EPS: $8.67

Expected EPS: $8.10

Stock price at close: $752 per share

Current price: $705.07 per share

Percentage change: down 6.3 percent

 

And what about the company that Alphabet replaced? It did just fine, easily beating the street.

Revenue: $75.9 billion

Expected Revenue: $76.54 billion

EPS: $3.28

Expected EPS: $3.23

Stock price at close: $99.99 per share

Current price: $96.91 per share

Percentage change: down 3 percent

 

One of the most recent companies to have gone public, and the last one to report earnings (reporting on Tuesday) was Etsy. It managed to beat on earnings, while falling short on EPS.

Revenue: $$87.8 million

Expected Revenue: $$86.7 million

EPS: loss of $0.04

Expected EPS: $0.01

Stock price at close: $7.39 per share

Current price: $7.65 per share

Percentage change: up 3.5 percent

 

While most companies did ok last quarter, as you can see above, Amazon got crushed. It lost on both EPS and revenue, and saw its stock crater 15 percent in after hours trading as a result. Perhaps, as one analyst put it, investors simply became too optimistic after a few quarters of profit growth.

Revenue: $29.3 billion

Expected Revenue: $35.93 billion

EPS: $1

Expected EPS: $1.56

Stock price at close: $635.35 per share

Current price: $555.23 per share

Percentage change: down 12.6 percent

 

Yelp can't catch a break. The company, which has been in the news lately for all the wrong reasons, also accidentally leaked its earnings early and then saw its stock plunge 10 percent as a result. Even though it beat on revenue and nearly matched on EPS, it still managed to wind up with a net loss of $22 million.

Still, its stock price has since recovered, and it up almost 24 percent since then. 

Revenue: $153.7 million

Expected Revenue: $152.4 million

EPS: $0.11

Expected EPS: $0.12

Stock price at close: $16.06 per share

Current price: $19.86 per share

Percentage change: up 23.7 percent

 

Fitbit has been struggling lately enduring investor trepidation about its smartwatches, which have hurt the company, which was said to have had the best IPO of 2015.

In its fourth quarter earnings, released earlier this week, and it beat, but still saw its stock plunge 15 percent on weaker than expected guidance. 

Revenue: $712 million

Expected Revenue: $648 million

EPS: $0.35

Expected EPS: $0.25

Stock price at close: $16.52 per share

Current price: $12.15 per share

Percentage change: down 26.5 percent

(Image source: istreetwire.com)


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