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Spotify adds new 'In Private' listening option

Secret Britney Spears fans take note: Your guilty pleasure listening is protected for now...

Technology trends and news by Nathan Pensky
September 30, 2011
Short URL: http://vator.tv/n/1faf

Of the recent design updates to Facebook, one in particular has hit a chord with users of popular online music streaming site, Spotify. Facebook's partnership with Spotify has enabled users to instantly update their news feed with cues as to what they're currently listening to. 

But the word on the street is that (*gasp*) people don't always want other people to know everything that they're doing online, all the time. And this includes what music they're listening to.

In the days since the unveiling of the new Spotify feature at Facebook's F8 convention, many have been voicing their complaints -- especially those who claim to love Charles Mingus but secretly jam out in their offices to Britney Spears.

Well, Britney fans can relax for now... Spotify has added a new "In Private" listening feature, which will allow users to listen to music without it showing up on their Facebook.

"We're rolling out a new client as we speak where you can temporarily hide your guilty pleasures. It works like a browsers private mode," said Spotify CEO Daniel Ek via his Twitter account.

This reaction to Facebook's instant updates of Spotify use is especially important considering yet another recent development in Spotify's terms and conditions. In addition to the instant updating Facebook feature, last week Spotify changed their policies so that new users could sign up for the online streaming music site only by way of their Facebook log-in.

Likewise, this was heard with a resounding cry of disapproval.

But Facebook may be facing bigger problems than whether or not people are angry about the broadcasting of their guilty pleasure listening. Several Washington public interest groups have drafted a letter asking the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Facebook over privacy concerns.

These groups include the Electronic Privacy Information Center and the American Civil Liberties Union.