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my.Flow
Location: San Francisco, California, United States United States
Founded in: 2015
Stage: Alpha (prototype)
Number of employees: 1-5
Funding history:
- Date: 01/2016, Accelerator/Incubator: $100 k
Investors: Noel Joyce
Short URL: vator.co/my-flow
Awards and mentions
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OMICS Health Informatics Conference Honorable Speaker
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HAX Batch 8 Admission and Participation
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Maker Faire Blue Ribbon Award 2015
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National Maker Faire Invited Participant 2015
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my.Flow

Peace of Mind. Period.
Startup/business
San Francisco, California, United States United States
http://trackmyFlow.com

my.Flow Inc. is a women's health analytics company building a tampon monitor. Our discreet wearable detects the saturation level of the user's tampon and passes the data to her phone, where our app notifies her when it's time to change. As well as providing in-depth data, this will eliminate an anxiety that plagues half of the world's population.

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Company description

All you have to do is take a look at the the latest Newsweek ("There Will be Blood - Get Over It," The New York Times ("Tampon of the Future,"), and The Guardian ("Fitbit for Your Period) and the Huffington Post ("This Company Wants You to Have Sex on Your Period") just within the past couple of weeks to know that there is at least one pressing pain point today that is underaddressed. Period. 

From latest Newsweek: “In today’s world, if there’s nobody dying it’s not on anyone’s agenda,” says Venkatraman Chandra-Mouli, a WHO scientist who’s worked in adolescent health for the past 20 years. “Menstrual problems don’t kill anyone, but for me, they are still an extremely important issue because they affect how girls view themselves, and they affect confidence, and confidence is the key to everything.”

We're here to help.

my.Flow Inc. is a women's health analytics company, working on a first-of-its-kind tampon monitor. Our product alerts its user as to the saturation level of her tampon via a notification on her phone. It takes the physical form of a small clip that the user can discreetly attach to her belt or undergarments, and insert her tampon string into. The vast majority of women we've talked to wish this product already existed and in fact are surprised it doesn't!

While many people might not know it, this solves a huge market gap. Although it may seem like a "nice to have" rather than a "must have" product, most women stain their clothes monthly - because of the taboo nature of the period, we're just really good at hiding it. 
Menstrual innovation is embarrassingly lagging, and it’s about time women had a smart device to prevent both staining/leakage, and infection related to leaving their tampons in too long. Although nearly all of us have mortifying tales about leaking through our clothing at some point since puberty, most of us don't talk about it. We are aiming to obliterate the inevitable shame and anxiety that half the world's population experiences monthly.
The user experience aim is convenience – currently, you can’t check the level of your tampon as it’s inside you, so many women err on the side of taking their tampon out prematurely, which is not only wasteful, both environmentally and economically, but also quite physically uncomfortable.

We have excellent customer validation - in both survey and in-person form -that an automated way to help prevent leakage and Toxic Shock Syndrome is something that women are ready to invest in for their personal menstrual health.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D6eTWkJ5LXE

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Team
  • Jacob McEntire
    Jacob McEntire | Founder
    I love to create and to help others. Engineering and entrepreneurship allow me to bring these two passions together in concrete and far-reaching ways to impact people all over the world.
  • Amanda Brief
    Amanda Brief | Founder
    As a Cofounder and the CEO of my.Flow, Amanda is ecstatic to be in a position where she is lucky enough to combine constant stimulation and problem solving with her deep passion of helping underserved populations - in this case, women!
Business model

Our price point for the $15 billion annual feminine hygiene market will be $49 for the wearable (a one-time purchase, as the battery lasts several years), in addition to a recurring $3 expense per extra per box of tampons, which is a consistent, bi-monthly purchase. This way, the lifetime value of each customer will not stagnate, and we put it at $350 per customer. 

To clarify, the clip worn by the user monthly on her pants/underwear, and the rest of the time optionally on her keychain for safe keeping, would cost $49 - it has battery life to last multiple years, so unless the user loses or breaks it of her own accord, it would be a one time purchase. Whereas women typically spend $12-$15 a month on tampons, our tampons will cost approximately $3 more per month total.

Competitive advantage

All you have to do is take a look at the the latest Newsweek ("There Will be Blood - Get Over It," The New York Times ("Tampon of the Future,"), and The Guardian ("Fitbit for Your Period) and the Huffington Post ("This Company Wants You to Have Sex on Your Period") just within the past couple of weeks to know that there is at least one pressing pain point today that is underaddressed. Period. 

We're here to help.

Women’s current solution to their primary menstrual pain points of leakage and potential of infection is to take their tampon out early. This is not only very physically uncomfortable, but is also wasteful, both environmentally and economically. This being a major, macro-level problem is evidenced by the amount of brand new attention and innovation within the space.

Some more modern, relevant innovations include the LOONCUP, a smart menstrual cup, but their circuitry is all inside the body, and not many women use menstrual cups to begin with. THINX is resuable extra-absorbent underwear, but you need to buy multiple pairs, which is costly, and have to carry the heavy blood-soaked material around until you change them. Currently, there exists no smart solution that monitors your flow in realtime, using the method that 70% of US women prefer - tampons. 

Investors